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First successful Grasshopper definition with variables and attractors … once defined it can be applied to any surface … Very Cool.

Alice Taylor thinks 3D printed avatars will make her business as big as Lego. Is she lost in Wonderland? | Breaking News | LondonlovesBusiness .com

Via Scoop.itDigital Fabrication – teaching using new technology

Martha Lane Fox tipped MakieLab as the new business to watch. What makes this start-up so special?
Via www.londonlovesbusiness.com

ALL THINGS STEAM | THE STEAM ACADEMY

Via Scoop.itDigital Fabrication – teaching using new technology

THE STEAM TEAM, an international collaboration of educators, researchers, artists, scientists, and other valued individuals sharing our vision are developing a revolutionary, global education model for education. We’re devoted to our vision of producing and packaging our curriculum and proven instructional methods in a manner that will provide free, online access to innovative and progressive K-12 education to educators and families worldwide.
Via thesteamacademy.wordpress.com

Re-envisioning No Child Left Behind, and What It Means for Arts Education

Via Scoop.itDigital Fabrication – teaching using new technology

Joseph Piro’s recent article in Education Week, “Going From STEM to STEAM: The Art’s Have a Role in America’s Future Too,” does a great job of explaining why the Arts need to be a part of that curriculum. It is the Arts’ ability to compel youth to think critically and express themselves creatively that will make them forerunners for 21st Century Learning.
Via performingartsworkshop.wordpress.com

STEAM – Not STEM Whitepaper | Steam Not Stem

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A special report in Business Week in 2007 observed:
“The game is changing. It isn’t just about math and science anymore. It’s about creativity, imagination, and, above all, innovation.”
On April 9, 2010 at the Arts Education Partnership National Forum, Education Secretary Duncan said,
“The arts can no longer be treated as a frill,” … arts education is essential to stimulating the creativity and innovation that will prove critical to young Americans competing in a global economy….”
At the same event Chairman Landesman of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) said,
“The arts provide us with new ways of thinking, new ways to draw connections…and they help maintain our competitive edge by engendering innovation and creativity.”
US businesses need more innovative employees so their companies can compete and together these businesses can provide the innovation required for our future economy. “Ready to Innovate”, a recent Conference Board report supported this need based on surveys of executives and school superintendents who agreed in the need for more innovative employees at all levels of the workforce and that education in Arts was a leading and reliable indicator of the creativity and innovation in applicants.
Via steam-notstem.com

Digital Craft

Via Scoop.itDigital Fabrication – teaching using new technology

So what do these developments mean for the future of both digital and handmade craft? If you ask Dries Verbruggen, he’ll tell you that eventually that question won’t even matter. Verbruggen, one-half of the Belgium-based design studio Unfold, believes we’re on the cusp of the post-digital era – a time when distinguishing between the digital and analogue ways of thinking will no longer be relevant. Instead, he says, the two will be so irreversibly intertwined that we won’t even notice a divide. “The digital, as a very dedicated thing, will just dissolve into the real world,” Verbruggen predicts.   Marcelo Coelho echos this same idea. He says it’s crucial that we find a way to seamlessly blend the digital with the tactile if we don’t want to see the richness of the physical world “replaced by shiny, glass-covered LED screens.”    
Via prote.in

State Of The Art: 9 Intriguing Examples Of 3-D Printed Design

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Early adopters turned to 3-D printing as a speedy way to prototype products, but, more recently, the technology has been leveraged to create finished pieces, including everything from decorative vases to jewelry and eyewear.
Via www.fastcodesign.com

THE NEXT TRILLION DOLLAR INDUSTRY: 3D Printing

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3D printing is getting hyped right now, with a front page story in The Economist and a long article in the Times, but we actually think it is underhyped.
Even if it fails to meet some of the expectations of its boosters (and that’s not a foregone conclusion), 3D printing will still probably become an enormous industry and have a tremendous impact on how we buy, sell and produce things.  
Via www.businessinsider.com

welcome to D-Shape

Via Scoop.itDigital Fabrication – teaching using new technology

D-Shape is a new robotic building system using new materials to create superior stone-like structures.
This new machinery enables full-size sandstone buildings to be made without human intervention, using a stereolithography 3-D printing process that requires only sand and our special inorganic binder to operate. D-Shape is a new building technology which will revolutionize the way architectural design is planned, and building constructions are executed. By simply pressing the “enter” key on the keypad we intend to give the architect the possibility to make buildings directly, without intermediaries who can add interpretation and realization mistakes.
Via d-shape.com

Drew Berry: Animations of unseeable biology

Via Scoop.itDigital Fabrication – teaching using new technology

We have no ways to directly observe molecules and what they do — Drew Berry wants to change that. At TEDxSydney he shows his scientifically accurate (and entertaining!) animations that help researchers see unseeable processes within our own cells.   “Even as a scientist, I used to go to lectures by molecular biologists and find them completely incomprehensible, with all the fancy technical language and jargon that they would use in describing their work, until I encountered the artworks of David Goodsell, who is a molecular biologist at the Scripps Institute. And his pictures, everything’s accurate and it’s all to scale. And his work illuminated for me what the molecular world inside us is like.”
Via www.ted.com